Welcome Back, Maine Gay Men’s Chorus

The Maine Gay Men’s Chorus
First Parish Church, Portland
Dec. 6, 2015
by Christopher Hyde

It’s good to have the Maine Gay Men’s Chorus back for Christmas. The chorus, which disbanded in 2012, has regrouped under the direction of Larry Jackson, and gave its first Holiday concerts Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the First Parish Church in Portland.

As in the past, the program was a mixture of traditional Christmas carols, humor and classical music.

The high point of Sunday afternoon’s concert was a performance of arias from Handel’s “Messiah” by tenor Martin Lescault. I have never heard better readings of “Comfort Ye My People,” and “Every Valley Shall Be Exalted,” technically or dramatically. Lescault sang these extremely demanding works without strain and with deep feeling.

As if embarrassed to be seen on these classical heights, the chorus immediately launched into a parody of the “Hallelujah” by the Sisters of the Immaculate Deception. Having taken a vow of silence, the sisters nevertheless wanted to perform the great chorus, and lined up on stage with large cue cards containing all the syllables of the text, which they displayed at appropriate beats in the score. It was a difficult feat to get the timing right, but also hilarious, especially with deliberate confusion at the end. Some of the nuns attempted to achieve a fortissimo by holding the cards higher.

Lescault was heard again as soloist in “My Grown Up Christmas List” and the encore, “Night of Silence,” by Daniel Kantor. I normally regard “Silent Night” as hallowed ground, not to be disturbed in any way, but Kantor’s eloquent and subdued descants over the tune sung by the entire chorus, seem an exception to the rule.

A second guest soloist was Jennifer Miller, who was instrumental in getting the chorus back together. She sang a pop version of “O Holy Night,” with accompanist Sarah Phinney on piano.

The show also included some of the gay parodies for which it has become known: “Walking in Women ’s Underwear,” to the tune of “Walking in a Winter Wonderland,” “Baby It’s Cold Outside,” by two guys, one of them bald, leading to the punch line “Your hair looks swell,” and “Christmas Toys for Girls and Boys,” exploring stereotyped gender roles. “Dance of the Toy Flutes” included both innuendo and two bear-like dancers, one in a tutu.

The traditional pieces were well done, especially the opening “Canon of the Bells” and “O Tannenbaum,” which I haven’t heard sung in German since World War II.
Eric Smith was fine as soloist in a soulful version of “Who Is She That Travels.”

As is the case with (almost) every chorus, the Gay Men’s needs more basses. Who knows, they could eventually rival the Red Army Chorus.