Tag Archives: Harold Stover

Voices from the Renaissance

Renaissance Voices
Cathedral Church of St. Luke
Dec. 16, 17, 2017
by Christopher Hyde

The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth’s shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.

The Christmas concert of the a cappella choir, Renaissance Voices, Saturday night and Sunday afternoon at the Cathedral Church of St. Luke, reminds me of Mathew Arnold’s image, in “Dover Beach,” of a faith that once held the Western World together. The music transports one to that era, when a still, small voice could yet be heard, and reindeer were merely the Lapp’s cattle.

Echoes resound in music director Harold Stover’s programming of modern music and that of the Victorian era, represented in this year’s concert by four motets by Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901). Rheinberger’s “Neun Advent-Motetten, Op. 176, are more difficult than his Renaissance models, especially in their demand for sustained tenuto of difficult intervals. They were worth the effort, however.

This year’s Renaissance-era offerings were relatively well-known, beginning with “Natus est Nobis,” by Tomas Luis de Victoria (1548-1611) and ending with “Canite tuba in Sion” (Blow the trumpets in Zion) by Hieronymus Praetorius (1560-1629).

The latter was something of a revelation, in that the listener knows the intent of the music (apart from the text) and can appreciate the composer’s success in rendering it. In this case,, the work consists entirely of combinations of trumpet calls, imitated by the choir, and is quite magnificent.

An effective juxtaposition was an anonymous “Laudemus Virginum“ (c. 1399), with a traditional English carol, “Blessed be that maid Marie,” similar in mood and perhaps as old.

Modern works included a deeply felt “O Magnum Mysterium,” by American composer Sally Hermon, and a setting of “A little child there is ybore”, by British composer David W. Jepson, sung by soprano Joanne deKay.

As customary at the Renaissance Voices Christmas program, the musical offerings were interspersed with appropriate readings of poetry, in this case two Christmas poems by Jane Kenyon, and “Department Store,” by Carl Dennis.

A work by Orlando de Lasso (1532-1594), seemed particularly appropriate to this season: “Veni Domine, et noli tardare…” (“Come, Lord, and do not delay. Pardon the misdeeds of your people, and bring the dispersed back to your land.”)

Today’s concert will be at 2:00 p.m.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal, He can be reached at classbeat@nstscape.net.

Back Cove Festival Opens on a High Note

Back Cove Contemporary Music Festival
Woodford’s Congregational Church
April 7, 2017
by Christopher Hyde

I came to the Back Cove Contemporary Music Festival (April 7, 8, 9) to hear the world premiere of Elliott Schwartz’s String Quartet No. 3 (“Portrait for Deedee”) played by the Portland String Quartet.
The quartet, Schwartz’ final work before his death last year, was all that I had hoped, but it was surrounded by other fine works, most of them in traditional forms, without the experimentalism that usually characterizes such festivals.

Looking at the programs for Saturday and Sunday, the remaining two days appear to be equally accessible.

The Portland String Quartet realized the Schwartz composition, written in memory of his wife, Deedee, almost perfectly. While it includes many of the composer’s mannerisms, such as musical quotes and use of the alphabet and numerology to generate motifs, it is considerably more dark in color than most of his work. I hesitate to use the word “tragic” in reference to one known for his unfailing good humor in the face of adversity.

The quartet also seems more thoroughly composed. The recurrent themes are developed and maintained, while the quotes, from his wife’s favorite music, fit in perfectly, like ghostly comments on the score. This promises to become one of Schwartz’s most popular works, almost making one believe in the magical power of numbers.

As for the rest of the program, I was particularly impressed by the work of the Portland Piano Trio, consisting of Tracey Jasas-Hardel, violin, Benjamin Noyes, cello, and Anastasia Antonacos, piano. They played four difficult works, in a variety of styles, with both spirit and understanding, an unusual combination.

They began the evening with “Number the Clouds,” by Delvyn Case, a dense and atmospheric setting of the Book of Job. After intermission, Case also contributed a highly effective musiking of “The Lord’s Prayer,” sung by soprano Elizabeth Marshall, accompanied by Harold Stover on the organ. Marshall performed the difficult feat of maintaining perfect intervals against the equal temperament of the organ.

Stover also played his own “Five Preludes on American Folk Hymns,” coaxing voices from the Woodford’s organ never heard before. The variations were truly amazing, even though I didn’t know most of the tunes. I wonder what he could do with “A Mighty Fortress…”

The Portland Trio finished the evening with Trio No. 1, by Nancy Gunn; “Choreodography (sic) No. 2” by Francis Kayali, a student of Elliott Schwartz; and  “Ancestry Variations” by Stepahie Ann Boyd, which takes a folk tune and varies it according to the styles of some famous composers. Entertaining and well-written, it was probably the most traditional of the three.

Gunn’s trio was also relatively tonal, with a driving, almost violent first movement, contrasted with a slower, nostalgic second.

Kayali’s offering was almost as quirky as Stover’s variations, consisting of Schoenbergian manipulations of a theme (not a tone row), which dissolve into a puddle of tonality.

Many of the composers were in the audience, accepting warm applause with the performers.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal, He can be reached at classbeat@netscape.net.

Renaissance Voices a Christmas Gift

Renaissance Voices
Cathedral Church of St. Luke
Dec. 17, 2016
by Christopher Hyde

The Renaissance Voices Christmas concerts, conducted by Harold Stover, have become so popular over the years that the large Cathedral Church of St. Luke was still about half full on Saturday night, in spite of snow and bitter cold that cancelled other events.

Those who braved the elements were treated to a warm, traditional selection of a cappella vocal music from around the world and across the centuries, interspersed with readings from poets as diverse as Carl Sandburg and Rainer Maria Rllke. Wintery works by Rilke and Heinrich Heine were read in German, followed by English translations.

The word traditional is appropriate because even the modern works on the program were modeled after Renaissance and Baroque music.  beginning with “Hail, Lady. sea-star bright,” (Ave, maris stella) by English composer Kathryn Rose (b. 1980), sung in Latin and built around a bass line that sounds like Gregorian chant, but more melodious. The higher voices weave a tapestry of sound around this solid foundation. It was compared to another Ave Maria by Jacobus Clemens non Papa (1510-1556), and held its own very well.

Two German composers who seemed almost mirror images of each other were Hugo Distler (1908-1942) and Johannes Eccard (1553-1611). The choir alternated between the two, and just when one thought a recognizable style had been established, another of the five motets would blur the line. Some were lively, some were like chants and some were almost fugal in their polyphony, but all were musical and deeply felt.

The first half of the program ended with a rapid, rhythmical “Facta est cum angelo,” by Italian composer Girolamo Baglioni (c, 1575-1608).

Opening the second half was “Come ye lofty, come ye lowly” by Gustave Holst (1874-1934), another imitation, this time of a medieval English Christmas carol, that couldn’t be told from he original.

An American work, “The angel’s carol,” by Crys Armbrust (b. 1957), sets a text by Nahum Tate (1625-1715) using the early shaped-note technique of choral singing,  in which the shape of the written notes dictates the harmonies to decorate a hymn tune,

The result is sometimes strange, like shifting northern-lights veils of sound, but always effective.

The program ended with a triumphant “Hodie Christus natus est” by Dutch composer Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562-1621). Following a standing ovation, the choir sang an encore of three verses of “Silent Night” in the original German,  wrapping up a fine and appropriate Christmas gift.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal, He can be reached at classbeat@netscape.net.