Tag Archives: Piano Teaching

You’ve Come a Long Way: A Piano Recital in the 21st Century

Piano Recital
Students of Ginger Yang Hwalek
Minsky Recital Hall, University of Maine
May 21, 2017

On Sunday I went to Minsky Hall, on the University of Maine Campus, to hear my grandson, nine-year-old Jordan Seavey, play a Beethoven Sonatina and a Tarantella by Stephen Heller. I stayed to hear the rest of Ginger Yang Hwalek’s students in recital. I had prepared myself for an ordeal, but the experience turned out to be an unanticipated pleasure.

Piano teaching has come a long way since I went to my first recital, when everyone was happy just to make it through “The Jolly Rancher.” Any graduate of Juilliard now probably plays better than Franz Liszt, and I’m happy to see that the improvement extends to those, like Jordan, whose feet don’t reach the pedals. All of Hwalek’s students seemed to enjoy what they were doing

Every piece, and there were some long and challenging ones, was played by heart (as we used to say) and although there were some minor hesitations at times, generally all went smoothly and in tempo. Jordan had the sonatina down pat, and even seemed to like playing it before an audience.

He came first on the program, and was followed by an even tinier Zoe Pulitzer, who played four short pieces, including a nice Hayden Quadrille, and ended with a Waltz for Four Hands by Heinrich Wohlfahrt, with her teacher playing secondo.

Sofie Reuter also played four short works, including a Haydn German Dance in D Major, but I was most impressed by her gliding portrait of “The Snake“ by Renée Christopher.

William Xu came next, with a CPE Bach Solfeggietto and a Sonatiina in A Minor by George Anton Benda, the first work on the program to require the use of crossed hands.

Vetri Vel played another Beethoven Sonatina, in F Major, plus a descriptive “Teasing Song” by Béla Bartók.

Nate Shearer performed an up-tempo Allegro from a Sonatina by Kuhlau (Is a pattern emerging here?) but seemed more at home in an atmospheric “L’Orage” (“The Storm”) Op. 109, No. 13 by Burgmüller, stemming from the days when pianos had attachments for rendering musical portraits of battles and thunderstorms.

I was floored by the grace and feeling of Inga Zimba’s Mendelssohn Song Without Words, Op. 55, No. 1.  Many professionals do not play it as well. Then she turned around and mastered something the exact opposite—a fiery and percussive study in overtones—Rodion Shchedrin’s “Russian Bell Chimes.”

Helen Shearer performed the Bach Invention No. 8 in F Major—all of the Inventions are more difficult than they seem at first glance—plus a dramatic “Knect Rupert” of Schumann.

Clementi’s Spiritoso from the Sonatina in C. Major, Op 36, No. 3, reminded me of Vladimir Horowitz’s predilection for this composer, but Cecilia Doering’s version of a Toccatina by Samuel Maikapar was even more virtuosic.

Emma Higgins’ Six Ecossaises by Beethoven were eminently danceable, followed by a wonderfully discordant Bagatelle, Op. 5, No. 1 of Alexander Tcherepnin

Robert Starer’s tone poems, Pink and Bright Orange, from “Sketches in Color,” as played by Mei Tian, were effective. I could see the correct shade of pink behind closed eyes, but pale yellow was as far as I could get with Bright Orange.

She was followed by Emma Shearer, with a highly proficient and descriptive interpretation of Joaquin Turina’s modern masterpiece “Clowns.” She then switched effortlessly to Greig’s melodic tone poem in sonata form: “Wedding Day at Troldhaugen,”

The Shearer sisters and brother got together for a delightful six-handed romp through Robert Vandall’s “Triple Dip,” a jazzy piece that combines a stride bass with overtones of bebop.

The program concluded with a performance by Mira Schubeck, Hwalek’s senior student, of Two Arabesques by Claude Debussy. These seminal works, with their unexpected transitions and quirky humor, presage Debussy’s mature piano music, and their premonitions were beautifully brought out. She was rewarded with flowers and a hug.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal, He can be reached at classbeat@netscape.net.