Tag Archives: Vivaldi

Early Music Festival Enlightens and Entertains

Early Music Festival
Portland Conservatory of Music
Oct. 28, 2018
by Christopher Hyde

The final concert of the 7th Annual Early Music Festival at the Portland Conservatory of Music, Sunday afternoon at the Woodfords Congregational Church, was devoted to Chamber Trios of the 18th and 19th Centuries, performed by Lydia Forbes, violin, Myles Jordan, violoncello piccolo, and Timothy Burris, the festival’s founder,  on lute and guitar.

The festival is always a combination of education and entertainment. The revelation in this case was the popularity of small chamber ensembles in the 19th century, centered around the guitar. Everyone is familiar with the piano transcriptions of operas and orchestral music that brought the latest compositions into middle-class parlors, but there was an equally flourishing market for  guitar-based works.

A strange example was the Grand Trio Extract de Mozart of Pierre Jean Porro (1750-1831). It consisted of an arrangement of the trio and minuetto from the Mozart Violin Sonata No. 21 in E Minor, K. 304.

The transcription, for guitar, violin and cello, was innovative and charming, but why not just play the original? The answer seems to have been portability. Porro was a military type, retiring with the rank of lieutenant colonel, and it is unlikely that he took a piano with him into the field. Also, pianos were not quite as ubiquitous (and cheap) as they later became, and many households were without one, whereas a guitar could be found almost anywhere. (La plus change…?)

Of course transcriptions were not the only musical forms available to a guitar-based trio, and some delightful examples were offered, by Antonio Vivaldi and Francois de Fossa (1775-1849). The lute part of the Vivaldi Trio in G Minor, (RV85) was particularly striking, with an uncanny ability to imitate even the brass sections of an orchestra. And loud. It made me think of another instrument not usually associated with trumpet calls: “The wedding guest here beat his breast for he heard the loud bassoon.” (“The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner.”)

Burris, on guitar, played a delicate but lively suite from an earlier era: three dances rom “Livre de Pieces Pour la Guittarre dedié au Roy,” by Robert de Visée, (ca 1655-1732.)

The program began and ended with J.S.Bach. Forbes and Jordan opened with four two-part canons from “The Art of the Fugue,” —well-played, profound and, as Jordan pointed out, “not at all flashy.” I sometimes wonder if Bach’s magnum opus, which he was working on until his death in 1750, was intended for public performance at all.

My opinion was bolstered by the final work on the program, the Bach Sonata in G (BWV 1021), which was everything the cannons were not—short, concise, brilliant and obviously written to entertain, something old Johann knew how to do very well.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal. He can be reached at classbeat@netscape.net.

Bach His Way

Bach His Way

by Christopher Hyde

In June of 2016, Lewis Kaplan, co-founder of the Bowdoin International Music Festival, launched a new enterprise in Portland that came as a revelation to many—the Portland Bach Festival, now known as the Bach Virtuosi Festival (June 17-24).

If, as I believe, performance is all, the festival dispelled any notion that J.S. Bach, arguably the finest musician who ever lived, was staid, or God-forbid, as boring as Hector Berlioz thought he was.

All of the performers, and a chamber orchestra, reminded me of Wanda Landowska’s aphorism: “You play Bach your way, and I’ll play him his way.” In many instances, during both the 2016 and 2017 season, it was as if the audience was hearing a familiar work for the first time. The reason, of course, was that Kaplan, a long-term professor of violin at Juilliard and an authority on Bach, was able to draw together some of the world’s foremost Bach interpreters, who also got along famously—in ensemble playing egging each other on until one began to believe that the court of Frederick the Great had come to the Age of Jazz.

This year’s Festival will include most of the original musicians, and expand its scope somewhat, to include composers deeply influenced by Bach, such as Bartok and Shostakovich (“Before Bach and Beyond,” June 19 at St. Luke’s Cathedral) and those who influenced him, such as Vivaldi and Buxtehude.

The final concert, June 24 at St. Luke’s will also include works by another giant, George Frederic Handel, plus another of my favorite Brandenburg Concertos, No. 4

The June 19 program will mark the first appearance of noted Maine pianist Henry Kramer, who will play a prelude and fugue from “The Well Tempered Clavier,” compared to a similar work by Dmitri Shosakovich. He will also appear in the Schumann Piano Quintet in E-flat Major, Opus 44, influenced by the Romanic composer’s study of Bach.

The program at Etz Chaim Synagogue, on June 21, will feature two sonatas, for violin and for flute, with Arthur Haas at the harpsichord, plus two contatas, “Vernugte Ruh, BWV 170, and “Weichet nur, betruebte Schatten, BWV 202. It will be followed by a panel discussion on “Music and Religion between Haas, professor of Harpsichord and Early Music at SUNY Stonybrook, the Rev. Cannon Frank M. Harron II, former Executive Director of Program and Ministry at the National Cathedral, and Gary S. Berenson, Rabbi, Etz Chaim Synagogue.

Two new venues this year will include a free concert at Falmouth Congregational Church on June 23 to support the Falmouth Food Pantry, and an evening celebration of Bach and Bacchus at the Cumberland Club on June 22.

Detailed descriptions of each program are available at www.bachvirtuosofestival.org/proram. Tickets are available through PortTIX.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal. He can be reached a classbeat@netscape.net.

Concertos and Brandenburg Concertos

Concertos and Brandenburg Concertos
Portland Bach Festival
June 17-25, 2017
by Christopher Hyde

I don’t know which of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos are most popular, but my favorites are No. 5, with its virtuoso keyboard passages, played at last year’s Portland Bach Festival by Arthur Haas on the harpsichord, and No 2, with its rousing piccolo trumpet part, to be performed this year on June 18 at St. Mary’s Church in Falmouth by John Thiessen.

Thiessen is noted for his virtuosity on this instrument, and the No. 2, with returning Festival artists, should be as outstanding as No. 5.

Haas will be returning as well, in the Vivaldi Flute Concerto in D Minor, with Emi Ferguson, flute, June 22 at Etz Chaim Synagog, and the Bach Harpsichord Concerto in D Major (BWV 1067) in the Sanctuary at St. Luke’s on June 23. He will appear in a number of other concerts, since  harpsichord continuo is virtually a necessity for baroque music, plus participating in a post concert lecture at Etz Chaim.

If the Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major (BWV 1048) is your cup of tea, you can hear that one too at St. Luke’s, plus the Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B Minor (BWV 1067), and the Motet “Jesu meine Freude” (BWV 227) by the Oratorio Chorale and soloists under Emily Isaacson.

The penultimate concert, June 24 at St. Luke’s,  promises to be something entirely different, featuring works that influenced Bach and others that were influenced by him, including a trio sonata by CPE Bach, the Vivaldi “Winter” Concerto and a Ligeti viola sonata.

The final work of the Festival will be the Cantata “Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen” (BWV 51) with soprano Sherezade Panthaki, whom Festival founder Lewis Kaplan calls “the greatest baroque soprano I have ever heard.” Be sure to hear her and soprano Jolle Greenleaf in the François Couperin “ Troisième Leçon à deux voix“ at the “Before and After” concert.

Cellist Beiliang Zhu will once again be playing an Amati lent to her by Florian Leonhard Fine Violins, who will also be binging other famous baroque instruments for display at the Bach and Beer event on June 19.

For further details of concerts and events, visit www.portlandbachfestival.org.

Christopher Hyde is a writer and musician who lives in Pownal, He can be reached at classbeat@netscape.net.